First Take on the Great #TwitterMigration

You’re online and reading a blog, so I’m going to assume you know that a multi-billionaire has purchased the microblogging site Twitter. This has caused great controversy and anxiety among the Twitter community. Some people seem to have left immediately, a couple of corporations have (temporarily?) suspended advertising on Twitter, and many people are flocking (pun absolutely intended) to other social media and microblogging sites.

The most popular of those is Mastodon, which is not actually a website itself; it’s open-source software used to build individual sites, called “instances,” that are run by volunteer administrators. Some instances are open for people to create accounts, a few are limited to certain users (the most famous of which is probably the European Union‘s instance), and a few more are personal instances with a population of one.

If you use WordPress for your own website or blog as well as reading here you’ll understand: WordPress is software that is used to create many individual sites. There’s also a website called WordPress, but it is far from being the whole of WordPress. Mastodon (the software) is similarly used to create social media platforms; some actually have the word “Mastodon” in their name but most don’t.

Although I don’t plan to quit Twitter any time soon, I have had a Mastodon account since 2018 and I just created another one on an instance dedicated to writers. So if you’ve been following me on Twitter, you can find me on Mastodon, too. By all means, give it a try and say “hello.” And if you have any questions, please leave them in the Comments; I might put together a longer post on how to get started on Mastodon if there seems to be interest.

Mastodon

On the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day

My Girl Scout troop did a beach clean-up on Earth Day.

“What year?” some of you will ask. But that’s my point: it was the first year and we didn’t really think about whether there would be another.

With the 50th anniversary approaching, I decided that I would mark the day, in part, by taking a walk to that same beach. As it turned out, COVID-19 means New York City is “hibernating” (as I’ve chosen to call it) and there aren’t any other events happening today, except virtually. That’s just one of the things that’s changed since 1970. There was no virtual or online back then.

The biggest thing that’s changed is that the neighborhood that used to be there is gone. It was washed away by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and all but about a dozen homeowners took a buy-out and left. Someday it will be a New York City park (incorporated into Great Kills Park), with flood mitigation (PDF) infrastructure, but for now it’s just open space returning to the wild and a great place for a socially-distanced walk.

Paved driveway in foreground. Behind, Canada Geese on grass, trees, telephone wires. A house barely visible in the distance.
A few driveways remain, but nature is reclaiming the Oakwood Beach neighborhood. Canada Geese are making themselves at home.

To some this return to nature is beautiful, and in time I’ll agree, but for now my feelings are mixed. Hurricane Sandy made landfall in October 2012, but it wasn’t until June of last year that I worked up the courage to see it for myself. Aside from that first Earth Day clean-up project, a friend in Girl Scouts had cousins who lived in Oakwood Beach. We used to visit occasionally on our bicycles and we had pretty much cornered the market on Girl Scout cookie sales.

Continue reading

Updating My Blog

You’ve probably noticed that I recently did a major update to the design of this blog. I’m very pleased with the outcome and I hope that you, as a reader, are also happy with it. (If you’re not, please leave a comment and let me know what’s not working–and what device, browser, app, etc. you’re using.)

As I mentioned in my first post this year, I’ve been expanding my scope to include other online forms. One of those is SlideShare, so I made a SlideShare presentation to explain how I updated Circle of Ignorance.

 

New and Improving

Sometimes you need to take a step back.

Entering 2014 seemed a good time to make some changes to Circle of Ignorance.

First, a little history. When I started blogging in 2008, it was an experiment and learning experience. (That blog was written on Blogger under a pen name and has been deleted.) In particular, I planned to learn a little about blogging and help a writer friend start her own blog. She didn’t bite, and after a few months I realized that the only way to generate real conversation was to blog under my own name.

So after giving the matter some thought, I started Circle of Ignorance on WordPress in 2010. At the same time I joined Twitter. For almost a year I posted regularly twice a week; but in 2011 my Dad needed major surgery followed by a month of physical therapy that derailed my blogging. I was trying to resume in 2012 when hurricane Sandy derailed me again.

Continue reading