First Take on the Great #TwitterMigration

You’re online and reading a blog, so I’m going to assume you know that a multi-billionaire has purchased the microblogging site Twitter. This has caused great controversy and anxiety among the Twitter community. Some people seem to have left immediately, a couple of corporations have (temporarily?) suspended advertising on Twitter, and many people are flocking (pun absolutely intended) to other social media and microblogging sites.

The most popular of those is Mastodon, which is not actually a website itself; it’s open-source software used to build individual sites, called “instances,” that are run by volunteer administrators. Some instances are open for people to create accounts, a few are limited to certain users (the most famous of which is probably the European Union‘s instance), and a few more are personal instances with a population of one.

If you use WordPress for your own website or blog as well as reading here you’ll understand: WordPress is software that is used to create many individual sites. There’s also a website called WordPress, but it is far from being the whole of WordPress. Mastodon (the software) is similarly used to create social media platforms; some actually have the word “Mastodon” in their name but most don’t.

Although I don’t plan to quit Twitter any time soon, I have had a Mastodon account since 2018 and I just created another one on an instance dedicated to writers. So if you’ve been following me on Twitter, you can find me on Mastodon, too. By all means, give it a try and say “hello.” And if you have any questions, please leave them in the Comments; I might put together a longer post on how to get started on Mastodon if there seems to be interest.

Mastodon

Life’s a Beach (Grass)

A Day with the Greenbelt Native Plant Center

For years I’d been curious about the Greenbelt Native Plant Center (GNPC). I don’t remember where I’d first heard about it, but it was there on the New York City Parks Department website, tantalizingly close yet never open to the public. Its inaccessibility only piqued my curiosity.

And then one day last year, as Spring was approaching and I browsed the Parks’ website for nature walks, there it was: a volunteer event at the GNPC! “Processing beach grass” is what the description said. Processing? Of course I pounced on it, even if I wasn’t quite sure what the task was. It wasn’t the first time I traded a bit of elbow grease (as my Grandfather called it) for access, and I doubt it will be the last.

Processing beach grass (Ammophila breviligulata, one of several species known as “beach grass”) turned out to mean stripping the dry, brown leaves from clumps of grass to leave the fresh green stems and roots ready for planting at various beaches in the City. It was fairly easy work; we could even sit down. Best of all, after we’d stripped grass for a couple of hours one of the GNPC staff offered to take us for a tour of the facility.

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Advice to New Bloggers

When I shared the news that I’ve given my blog a makeover, it led to a short conversation with Barbara, one of my LinkedIn connections. I asked if she has a blog and she replied, “No, but I’d love to start one for Emergency Management and Public Safety issues.” Well, I happen to be hunkered down in New York City while we wait to see if the forecast blizzard turns out to be the apocalypse they’re forecasting, so I’m going to use my time to share some suggestions for new bloggers.

If it seems like everyone and his brother already has a blog, it may be close; but there are a few who still haven’t joined the party. There’s still room!

I started blogging on a whim–and my goal wasn’t really to have a blog of my own but to help a writer friend start a blog of her own. As I played around with it, I got interested in building a better blog of my own. Most of what I know is self-taught, learned by experimentation and looking at what other bloggers do. In retrospect, that’s a very good way to do it–the online world changes so frequently that any print book you may find on blogging will be slightly out of date. (Though having a print reference at hand might be helpful at first, so if it works for you go ahead–just remember that what you find on your new blogging platform might be a little different than what’s in the book.)

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Close to Home

The post I was preparing for Blog Action Day has been scrapped. It was too academic, too impersonal, and now much too irrelevant.

This past weekend I was reminded that even in the most developed nations, where rule of law and respect for human rights are the norm, there are those who act out of hate. They single out targets based on irrational fear and bigotry. Yes, even here in one of the most diverse and cosmopolitan cities on Earth.

Sadly, there have always been isolated incidents of hate in New York City. The flip side of our wonderful diversity is that it isn’t always easy for people of different cultures, religions, languages and opinions to live side-by-side in close quarters. Usually this creates a stimulating environment of contrasts.nOccasionally there are flare-ups.

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